Category Archives: Emotional Intelligence

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Everything we do uses up energy, and as a byproduct of living in the west, many of us are ignorant, if not resistant, to the idea that we can manage our energy in ways that allow us to be the best us we can be. Here are a few reasons you should give it a try! 1: Keeping your energy in a neutral place allows you to look at problems from all angles No one makes their best decisions when they’re in an extremely good or bad place energetically. If you’re elated about certain things, such as a specific person’s performance at work, you may become blind to some of that person’s issues. Inversely, the saying, “blinded by rage” exists for a reason. Through daily grounding exercises and conscious acknowledgement  Read the full article…

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I was thinking about this saying last weekend and realized that there are many levels of peace involved with this! 1: Self Are you at peace in your heart, mind and soul?  The ability to be calmly grounded and at peace internally touches everyone that you come into contact with.  Most of us have a constant dialogue going on in our minds about family, work, politics, the community.  Very few have peaceful minds.  There’s a lot of research that shows the incredibly positive impact that mediation has on people’s lives.  Exercise achieves the same thing for many people.  I also teach a grounding exercise that when done regularly helps you shift yourself in challenging moments.  Peace must start in our own hearts before it spreads  Read the full article…

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Happiness and engagement are two factors critical to the success of the workplace. While making workers happy does not make a company profitable by itself, it does contribute to productivity and other pivotal measures such as willingness to collaborate with others. An office of angry, disgruntled employees who want nothing more than to do their eight hours and go home will likely not lead to a successful company in the long haul. As such, many businesses do their best to bolster employee engagement, which is a key factor in keeping everyone at the company “emotionally and intellectually” committed, according to research by Inderscience Publishers. This could include everything from the popular foosball or ping-pong table purchases to end-of-the-year parties and bonuses. These initiatives are done to bolster  Read the full article…

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Admit wrongdoings: Perhaps the most obvious way to hold yourself accountable is to admit when you’re wrong or have made a mistake; there is much to be said for someone who is willing to do so. It’s memorable when people will accept responsibility, but it’s equally memorable when someone seems to seldom apologize. Take pride in your work: Since you are responsible for the work that you complete, it’s important to give it your all. Even if a task seems simple or mundane, you want to show that you are responsible for the effort put into your assignments and you hold yourself to a high standard. Don’t make excuses: There’s a difference between an excuse and a valid reason. Generally, the difference between the two  Read the full article…

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We know that having a positive attitude impacts those around us, including our spouses, partners, children, friends, roommates, and coworkers, but have you considered how having a positive attitude impacts your own wellbeing? It’s easy to pinpoint things to blame for our mood–the traffic on the way to work, the oatmeal that exploded in the microwave this morning, being late because you had to stop for gas, but the reality is that only we are in charge of our moods. We can get upset at various circumstances and people, but we don’t have any control over these things. The best that we can do is to take ownership of our attitude. If we only really have control over our own attitudes, shouldn’t we do our  Read the full article…

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1.Take a break: A break could be anything from taking a deep breath for several seconds, to walking around for fifteen minutes, to taking a personal day off. (Of course, make sure that your version of a break is acceptable at your workplace. Leaving in the middle of a workday without warning for long periods of time might not be kosher, so use your judgment and the established guidelines.) Other ways to take a break: Make some tea. Get a snack. Grab a coffee. Drink a glass of water. Stretch- maybe you’re tense from sitting at your desk and could use a little bit of movement. Talk to a coworker for a few minutes. Find something that works for you; sometimes you need to take  Read the full article…

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There are many ways in which you can show someone you think highly of them. You don’t have to directly tell someone that you admire them in order for them to feel respected! Here are a few ways of showing respect that should work for you and your coworkers. Listening: This means listening even when you don’t agree with what someone is saying, and listening when you might feel like zoning out. People feel respected when they know their voice is being heard. This is a very important part of being respected, and is the basis for respect. Being open: If you are constantly shutting down people’s ideas and not giving them much of a chance, they won’t think that their contributions matter. Being open  Read the full article…

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When you were a kid, you were probably told platitudes such as, “be a team player” and “treat others the way you want to be treated.” As adults, we (hopefully) don’t receive reminders like this, but these clichés still hold value for us. When you go to work, the easiest people to work with are those that are team players, and those that treat you how they would like you to treat them. These clichés, among others, could be under the umbrella term “emotional intelligence.” Do you want to work for someone who can’t decipher how his or her staff reacts to an idea? Do you want to work with people who shoot down others’ suggestions and only want to go forward with his or  Read the full article…

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It’s difficult to know which direction to guide people without a sound understanding of where they’re coming from.

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Emotional intelligence can be used to predict the success and performance of employees.