Tag Archives: Communication

Share

Our Positive Power and Influence Program focuses on the use of personal, not positional power. Many people use their positional power in very productive ways. However, if the number one reason people leave their jobs is because of their bosses, it would indicate that people in positions of power do not use that power very effectively. We have traditional power relationships, like manager to direct report, but we also have power relationships with suppliers and partners. It is interesting to me that so many organizations give lip service to developing positive relationships with suppliers and win-win negotiations. The problem is that if procurement has specific objectives concerning money spent, and they are in a power position due to size, they still seem to act as  Read the full article…

Share

In today’s world, everything is about networking. Yes, it is a buzzword, but we need people, we need relationships, and we need to develop connections internally and externally. Here’s a definition of networking: two people come together to efficiently learn about each other, give a window into who they are and what they do, and create interest to meet again and to explore synergy. What is the organizational outcome? Silos are broken down, mutual support is created, and more efficient solutions are found. Networking broadens our view of the organization, increases innovation, cost effectiveness and efficiencies. For many extroverts, networking comes easily. For introverts, though, it can be a bit more challenging. Think of it in terms of the SMS Situational Influence Model. The first  Read the full article…

Share

At birth, we began to express our personal needs to those around us, often very directly! While parents and relatives often complied because they were “supposed to,” a more subtle process was at work. At this early stage of our lives, we recognized that these important others felt rewarded by our smiles and felt unhappy or even punished by our tears. We built quickly on this fundamental discovery as our needs became more complex. We learned to state our likes and dislikes more clearly to support our demands. We discovered the value of bargaining and appealing to others’ personal needs in order to meet our own. We learned that it is not always necessary to give reasons for our needs, that it was possible to  Read the full article…

Share

Group meetings present a major opportunity to use your power and influence skills positively. You can direct a group’s concentrated attention toward your objectives in a relatively short period of time. You can address issues or objections in front of all concerned parties. Your investment of time and energy in preparing for and participating in meetings has a high potential return. Group meetings also present risks in using your power and influence skills positively. You may have difficulty achieving your goals.  In groups, many complex interactions occur that you may not be able to anticipate or control. Time and space limitations may restrict your ability to maneuver. Person-to-person skills that work well in two-person meetings sometimes fail in groups. People tend to adapt their individual  Read the full article…

Share

What makes a good leader? So many people ask this question. There are statements such as “good leaders are born, not made.”  Some people say that leadership is about influence. Others insist it’s about making decisions. As I write this, I realize that leadership comes in moments, and anyone can be a leader. I think it’s 1) the ability to recognize the moment, 2) determining the required action, and 3) influencing people. Simple, right? Sometimes those three things can take months, and sometimes it can happen in a matter of seconds. The most dramatic are those decisions that are made in seconds – usually extreme situations where a decision is made, people are influenced and lives are saved. I don’t have many of those moments  Read the full article…

Share

Positional power is limited. The organization divides power and resources among individual positions to achieve its mission. Position or job descriptions provide a roadmap or template of how individual members of an organization should work together. Each job description authorizes a functional group or manager to conduct a specific aspect of organizational business. Delegation of power and authority by others is finite. Individuals often place limits on their own positional power. While positional power is already finite and limited, many people do not use or claim all that is available to them. They may fear conflict with others, but more often they may not understand what behaviors support the positive use of positional power. Furthermore, certain value conflicts may exist in the organizational culture that  Read the full article…

Share

Are you sitting at your desk reading this blog?  Where are you?  Look around you. Don’t think.  What does your energy feel like? What do you feel right now?  Are you happy?  Frustrated?  Meh? What does your body feel like?  Are you feeling energetic? Tired?  Sore? How aware are you of your energy and where it is in your body? When I work with people around the impact they are having on other people, I look at and feel their energy. I talk about Push, Pull and Moving Away Energy and that there’s positive, neutral and negative uses of influence energy. For example, push energy comes from your head when you are using logic. If you’re passionate, and trying to influence someone with your logical  Read the full article…

Share

The position of Project Manager is one of the fastest growing and most dynamic roles in organizations across all industries. It can also be the most demanding role. Much of the most important work in your organization gets done via projects. Personal and organizational success therefore rests, in large measure, on project success. The problem is, projects don’t always succeed. Even superbly qualified project teams may find themselves shackled by scope creep, resource depletion, lack of teamwork, or unexpected shifts in project specs. Strong project leaders steer their project teams clear of such obstacles. They skillfully interact with team members as well as key stakeholders to drive projects to their intended destinations, on time and within budget. Based on our research with over 30 project  Read the full article…

Share

Early in our lives, we responded to conflict and anxiety with the instinctive “flight or fight” response. As we grew up, we found a third path. We learned to handle internal or external conflict constructively, to hold off instinctive reactions, and to find more positive ways to solve problems. We found it beneficial to withdraw from heated situations long enough to cool down or change, to think about things and reflect on our own feelings, and to return ready to work through the tension. When we discovered that others had as much difficulty dealing with tension as we did, we became more sensitive to their inability to cope under certain circumstances. We pulled back to give them room to regain their equilibrium. We learned the  Read the full article…

Share

Human beings are social creatures. We like to spend time with and do things for people we like.  We tend to distance ourselves from people who are “different”.  However, in the workplace we do not generally have the luxury of choosing the people with whom we work. That means that sometimes we have to develop a relationship with someone we don’t like for whatever reason: personality, different opinions, different thinking style, or they just look weird to us.   So many people have said to me: How do I build relationships?  This always seems like such a strange question, but it really is challenging for some of my more technically oriented colleagues.  I usually suggest taking some time to get to know the other person,  Read the full article…